Save NYC Carriage Horses From Radical Animal Rights Activists

0

Save NYC Carriage Horses From Radical Animal Rights Activists is a project of carriage horse supporter Jill Adamski.

Latest from Save NYC Carriage Horses

As the weather’s warming up for summer, we’d like to remind everyone that NYC horse carriages do not operate when it is above 89 degrees Fahrenheit. (But remember you can still come take a ride with the night shift when the temperature drops in the evening and they head back out!) Of course, when temperatures reach 90 degrees and a heat suspension is issued, the horses don’t just disappear on the spot! The law allows them to finish a ride they have already started, rest their horse in the shade, and allows thirty minutes of travel time back to the stable. (Drivers also must receive the suspension in writing from the NYPD/DOH, as the temperature may vary in different areas, and on different thermometers/phone apps. Many choose to receive a textmessage when the suspensions are issued and lifted.) NYCLASS wants their followers to feel like they’re not useless, so they have been making FaceBook posts every time a heat suspension is issued, urging their minions to make sure the carriage horses stop operating. This is unnecessary. There are five agencies which monitor and enforce the regulations NYC carriage horses work under and NYCLASS is not one of them. NYCLASS doesn’t inform their followers that horses can and will be outside when it is 90 degrees while they are finishing their last ride, or heading back to the stable. This causes people to make unnecessary and wasteful calls to 311 and even 911 to report horses that they see outside during a heat suspension which are fully in compliance with the law! If a horse is provided with enough shade, rest, and water it is also not dangerous for a horse to operate when it is 90 degrees. Many carriage horses, trail horses, eventing horses/etc. safely work, or run on their own terms in pastures in much warmer conditions all over the world. While some cities have their carriage horses work safely suspended at 98 degrees, NYC has some of the strictest regulations and lowest temperature operation restrictions at 89. Please don’t harass NYC carriage horse drivers when the temperature rises, they are trained professionals that know how to take the best care of the horse they’re working with.

Photo Credit: Jill A. (Silver The NYC Carriage Horse, Surprised To Discover His Water Trough Is Shared With The NYPD Horses In Central Park.)
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

All should be made aware that NYCLASS (the main organization working to ban horse carriages from NYC) is against animal entertainment of any type, including pony rides for children, as noted in this screenshot. A few days ago a riding horse slipped and bumped into a parked Taxi in NYC. The horse was uninjured and had the Taxi been a boulder, and the background trees instead of buildings, a common incident like this wouldn’t have made the paper. NYCLASS has attempted to spin the incident against the NYC carriage horse industry because the riding horse lives in a stable with carriage horses and ponies that provide children with joy at their birthday parties. Did we already mention that NYCLASS isn’t only trying to end the partnership between carriage drivers and their horses, but also wants to take ponies away from children?! Please be aware of all of the goals of the organizations you support before you jump on board with them. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

We thought we’d let you know about another celebrity that’s recently enjoyed a carriage ride. A few weekends ago, carriage driver, Hermilo and horse Arnie gave Sting and Trudie a ride around Central Park! You don’t have to be a tourist to enjoy a carriage ride =)

Photo Credit: Ata
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Most people are familiar with the pigeons that surround the crumbs NYC horse carriages leave behind from their buckets of oats, but few know about the ducks. On most nights these three different looking ducks (a Wood Duck & male and female Mallards) stop by Grand Army Plaza to pick up the crumbs after the pigeons have gone to sleep. It’s as if they discuss hanging out in this spot each night before heading over, as they’re always seen together, and they never told any of the other ducks at the pond about it. Passerby enjoy spotting the ducks here so far from where they’re usually found, and some of the horses watch them curiously, as shown. It’s another great example of city animals coexisting. We can’t imagine how many birds would be devastated if the horses were no longer around the hackline to share their snacks.

Photo Credit: Jill A.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

You may have noticed a recent lack of updates on this page, but don’t worry it’s still an active page! I thought I’d share a personal post that should explain what I’ve been so busy with:
After getting to know the people and horses in the NYC horse carriage industry, I spent the last few years as an outsider, speaking and writing about the bond and partnership horse carriage drivers share with their horses, but it wasn’t until very recently when I started driving them on my own that I was actually able to feel it. I haven’t been working with the horse I was partnered with for very long, but since the first night I started to gain his trust. When I’m standing with him, I talk to him, scratch his withers, give him his oats, and offer him carrots. When we work together I make sure he gets enough water, I brush him, comb his mane, and assess his overall comfort. In turn for gaining his trust, he gains my trust. When something makes him nervous, I’m there to reassure him; I’m not just using the lines or whip, I’m talking to him and he listens, and that keeps us both safe. The money we make is split between us. Some of it goes towards my cost of living, while his portion goes towards his own. It helps cover his board, hay, veterinary exams, shoes, and everything else that goes into equine care. Even the tips I make chip in to buy him carrots. I’m grateful for the work he does and the partnership he shares with humans ensures his own health and safety. His work is easy for him and his calm attitude proves to me that he enjoys it. Some people show us their ignorance when I drive him. They call to us, “animal abuse!” But they’re blind the beauty that’s in front of them, as what we’re taking part in is anything but. They know not that they are insulting my horse, who shows great pride in his work, or me who gave up higher paying jobs to help make a difference in this horse’s life. When I drive him, I’m confident that I am doing something good. He might not be owned by me on the paperwork, but when I’m with him, he is my horse. I will drive other horses and I will care for them too, but this horse will always be my first, and I will always remember him for that.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook
Share.

About Author

Christina Hansen is a New York City carriage driver and a spokesperson for the carriage industry. She is a proud member of Teamsters Local 553.

Leave A Reply